Monthly Archives: November 2013

Chicken & Drumstick curry…..Korioora Munakkai

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      One of the things I really like to do is get an ingredient that I have never tasted and never prepared before,bingo this recipe has one “drumstick“…. that’s right I said drumstick, or to give it its correct name…..Sahjan Ki Phalli this being a core ingredient and most poplar vegetable  in southern india cuisine and is often found in sambhar.Sahjan Ki Phalli Sahjan is in fact the immature long green pods of the Moringa tree another species that you will not find throughout Europe, you can also eat the flowers and leaves of this tree so a vital ingredient and crop to the food of the villages I suspect In this particular case we are using it in…..

Korioora Munakkai

 

A spicy delight of chicken and tamarind not too mention the aforementioned drumstick vegetable that with only one look you can SAM_3425understand how it gets its name.SAM_3423

I am so lucky to have a large Asian community in the city I live in and even more lucky to be able to access the raw ingredients that appear so unusual and are really at the end of the day just fruit and veg that is yet to reach the supermarkets that determine what we all eat … that being an argument for another day.

so a visit to the Indian supermarket was the order of the day and yes success they of course had it although it doesn’t come cheap but why should it it has come halfway round the world and everyone involved needs to get paid … ouch my food miles are totting up I can always plant yet another tree though that seems to do the trick and salve the conscience….

The following recipe is easy enough although there are a lot of ingredients and I didn’t use a whole chicken I just used the crown as it was only for two….

this recipe is for four persons

The Whats in it

 

180gm Ghee

2 bay leaves

3 cinnamon sticks

4 cloves

1/2 tsp Fenugreek Seeds

1 tsp Kalonj(Nigella)Seeds

3 onions Sliced

1/2 tsp Ground Turmeric

1/2 tsp Ginger pasteSAM_3419

1/2 tsp Garlic paste

1 tblsp Ground coriander roasted

1 tsp sesame seeds

1 large chicken cut into chunks on the bone

1 small tomato

1 tablespoon ideally fresh coconut but soaked desiccated will do!

2 tsp chopped red chilli

15 Curry leaves

4 tablespoons of Toddy, beer will do if you can’t get Toddy

6 drumsticks (Sahjan Ki Phalli) peeled and cut into 6 cm pieces

12-15 black peppercorns

250ml Tamarind extract

1 Tablespoon Gram Flour….

1 Pint of water or chicken stock

Salt

To garnish

6 green chillies

1 Bunch coriander

6 sprigs Mint….

The How to

Heat the ghee in a karahi or large frying pan over a medium heat, add the bay leaves, cinnamon, cloves and fenugreek and kalonji seeds and stir fry for about 1 minute.

Then  add the onions and stir fry for about  until golden brown frying for ten to fifteen minutes usually does the trick.

Add the turmeric, ginger and garlic pastes, and stir fry for a couple of minutes more, before adding the ground coriander and sesame seeds and giving it all a good stir.

When the oil rises to the surface, add the chicken and continue to stir fry until it releases its juices, then continue to fry for about 8-10 minutes, or until the liquids have evaporated and the chicken is brown.SAM_3422

Add the tomatoes, coconut, red chilli and curry leaves and cook for a further 3 minutes.  Add the toddy or beer and cook for a few minutes until the liquid is absorbed.

now you can add the drumsticks, black peppercorns, 750 ml/1.25 pints (3.25 cups) water or chicken stock and the tamarind extract.  Reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 30 minutes, or until the chicken and drumsticks are cooked.

Dry roast the gram flour on a tawa, or griddle or in a small frying pan (skillet) for about 1 minute to remove the raw smell, then transfer to a bowl.  Add 250 ml/8 fl oz (1 cup) water and mix well.  Add to the curry to thicken the sauce, then mix well and simmer for 5 minutes, or until the sauce thickens.  Add more water if it is too thick.  Garnish with green chillies, coriander and mint leaves.

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The trouble with a curry blog is sometimes

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Sometimes I just like to sit, resting after a day at the coal face of life watching television enjoying the life that is mine. Curry for me is not a life style it is something I like to eat nothing more, and as such it is not my religion or my raison detre. I say this as I have not posted much recently owing really to the simple fact that I haven’t cooked much, well not anything that I would wish to write about.

The trouble with blogging especially on a recipe site where you are under a certain obligation to at least try the things you are posting as recipes, is what happens if you don’t like the result?

Do you still post it and enthuse that it was a fantastic little recipe and let the people decide or do you say it is not to your taste!

Answers at the foot of the page if your that way inclined!

The next problem if that is the right word is one of you only really eat your dishes once and you to some extent are relying on what has to be regarded as the taste buds of time, put simply if it is a traditional recipe then tradition cannot be wrong, now there’s an assumption! Further still because you have a busy life revisiting a previously published recipe means you may not, as is most often the case where I am concerned publish anything that week at all as you have had your curry fix for the week and gluttony well that’s a sin.

Where there is a case for Demonology(click to see more) or for the uninitiated  those recipes that I claim as my own or have taken ownership of; well they take time to conceive as I am not a natural chef, and although I have been much blessed with a copious and ever overflowing imagination find perceiving tastes a very unusual concept to say the least, and therefore  take a long time to reach the page that is this blog, hopefully that is time well spent and is evidenced by the tasty result, or not as may be the case!

I do like to write too and therefore a blog is a fantastic vehicle to help in the achievement of that want, but a recipe blog is sometimes not, as it is the recipes that dominate and not really the writing.

That then is the reason for this Saturday morning minor monologue which I hope you have enjoyed and will “Like” as only bloggers can…. there will hopefully be a recipe coming later today traditional this time  so watch this space for more on

Korioora Munakkai

A chicken delight flavoured with tamarind and more than enough spice to keep you as happy as a spice seller in a Bombay bazaar

later’s Curry lovers

Fish curry of the sitting Patiently kind!

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SAM_3414  SAM_3416This recipe springs from all of those hung over individuals who tell me that take away curries taste better the morning after.

Hey if cold curry is your thing for breakfast who am I to argue! Personally I never have left overs and I guess that says more about me than anything else, I only mention this as this sauce is left to sit around for “as long as it takes” well four or five hours or longer if you like… overnight is good too. Apart from that little similarity the comparison with take away food ends there!

The dish I offer up here is a fish curry for which I used a firm white fish, Cod in this case but any fish or sea food will thrive in this sauce, which I do have to say is robust and spicy enough for most, you could cut back on the chilli if that is your want, as in this particular case this curry is not and I say again is not traditional other than the spices that are added that are common to the cuisine that is Indian. However this is one very tasty curry that if you take the time with and leave it to stand for hours avoiding the temptation to gobble it down, will result in a taste spectacular try it once and you will be hooked. I am suggesting that preparation and cooking time together with the patient bit in the middle is ok at five hours but brilliant at eight to twelve hours

The sauce should always be made first and allowed to cool to room temperature and left for at least five hours, but use it at two or three if you really must!

My advice is make the sauce then do the marinade then bring the two together in something around five hours, the time invested will I assure you reflect in the taste that is a sweet and sour curry experience for which I make no apologies, so go on head down and cook, I hope you enjoy it!

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The LONG LONG Sauce

1tsp brown mustard seeds

1tsp Fennell seeds

.5 tsp  peppercorns

3 green cardamom pods

.5 tsp cumin seeds

6 Curry Leaves

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1 large Onion chopped

2 Green Chillies deseeded and chopped

2 cloves Garlic Finely chopped

2.5 cm sq Ginger, finely chopped

1tsp Turmeric

.5tsp Asafoetida

6 Medium Tomatoes  rough chopped

300ml Vegetable Stock

2 tsp Tomato Puree

2 tsp Tamarind puree

2 tsp Jaggery

Salt to taste

3 tsp ground Cashew Nuts

Getting saucey

Skin the tomatoes by placing them in  boiling water for a few moments, then roughly chop.

To a tablespoon of Coconut oil bought up to temperature in your karahi or heavy based pan you can use ghee if you prefer, add the whole spices, the brown mustard, Fennell seeds, peppercorns, green cardamoms and cumin seeds and fry until the mustard seeds are all a splutter.

Then add the onion and fry until golden brown but not caramelised.

Add the garlic and the ginger and the chillies and cook for a couple of minutes more before adding the turmeric and asafoetida, with a splash of the stock if required to ensure that the spices don’t stick!.

Add the chopped tomatoes and continue to cook until they soften and have passed that raw uncooked stage.

Add as much of the stock as you need to cover all the ingredients bring to the boil and then reduce  the heat to a simmer, adding the tomato puree and the Tamarind paste, taste and adjust the seasoning of salt and pepper before finally adding the jaggery, and the cashew nut paste.

I also added a little extra chilli powder here too but the choice is yours when you taste judge it to the as you like it and then leave it alone, all that’s left then is to continue cooking at a simmer for about fifteen minutes whilst ensuring that everything is well mixed before setting aside to cool for as long as you like, but at least until the sauce is at room temperature.

                                                               Now  to make the marinade

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1tbsp level Ghee or coconut oil

75 g diced shallots

1 tsp clove garlic paste

1 teaspoon ground aniseed

1 Dried Red chilli crumbled

1 teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon ground turmeric

.5 tsp garam masala

2 tablespoons lemon juice

Salt and pepper

3 tbsb yoghurt

500gm white fish cut into large bite sized chunks

Marinade Patiently

To a level tbsp. of ghee or coconut oil add the shallots and fry until translucent adding the garlic and frying for  a few minute more…..set aside to cool

Add the powdered  spices and crumble in the dried red chilli add the lemon juice to the yoghurt and stir well. Add a little salt and pepper to taste, stir in the fried shallots mix well and add to the fish ensuring all the surfaces of the fish are covered in the marinade, refrigerate for a minimum of three hours…..

After you have sat patiently doing the things that patent people do now is the time to bring the two things together

The Final Straight

Pour the sauce into a heavy based pan and heat gently until just below boiling, and then add a large tablespoon of the fish marinade to the sauce do not add the fish yet and continue to heat until the sauce reaches a thick gravy consistency then introduce the fish and ensure that the fillets are completely covered in the sauce increase the heat slightly and bring the sauce up to a gentle simmer cover and cook until the fish is cooked through … serve with whatever you like to eat with a fish curry….SAM_3415